Friday, November 13, 2020
2 min read

Friday, November 13, 2020

It's 43 degrees in Lexington today. Here's the news—

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If There’s Something Valuable Under the Soil, Life Aboveground Can Be Hard

Bill McKibben, New Yorker (Tweet)

I’d been thinking of that phenomenon this week, because Tuesday marked twenty-five years since the execution by hanging of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Nigerian novelist and playwright who was a leader of the Ogoni people in the Niger Delta, a place cursed by the pools of oil beneath the ground. She is a professor at Barnard College and its director of campus sustainability and climate action, and the author of a new book, “[Fixation: How to Have Stuff Without Breaking the  Since 2013, she has operated Fixup, a pop-up repair shop that employs local theatre artists, stagehands, and technicians to repair broken household items—so far it has diverted more than ten thousand pounds of goods from landfills.

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‘I Am Greta’ Review: Birth of a Climate Warrior

Nicolas Rapold, New York Times (Tweet)

In September 2019 at the United Nations Climate Action Summit, Greta Thunberg made headlines by condemning world leaders for abandoning today’s children to the ravages of climate change. Grossman shot “I Am Greta” nearly single-handedly over two years, staying close to Thunberg’s point of view and folding in her experience with Asperger’s syndrome, which she partly credits for her singular focus.

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Using Wolves as First Responders Against a Deadly Brain Disease

Jim Robbins, New York Times (Tweet)

If the idea holds, it could mean that wolves have a role to play in limiting the spread of chronic wasting disease, which is infecting deer and similar animals across the country and around the world. “Taking the sick and weak removes chronic wasting disease from the population, because any animal showing any signs of it will get killed and eaten by the wolves,” Dr. Dobson said.